There Sir Geoffroi de Charny fought gallantly near the king… The whole press and cry of battle were upon him because he was carrying the king’s sovereign banner [the Oriflamme]… So many English and Gascons came around him from all sides that they cracked open the king’s battle formation and smashed it… Sir Geoffroi de Charny was killed with the banner of France in his hand, as other French banners fell to earth.

Jean Froissart (c. 1337 – c. 1405) 

The Oriflamme (from Latin aurea flamma, “golden flame”) was the battle standard of the King of France in the Middle Ages.
In French, the term has come to mean any banner with pointed ends; by association with the form of the original.
When the Oriflamme was displayed on the battlefield it indicated that no quarter was to be given, its red colour being symbolic of cruelty and ferocity.

The Oriflamme (from Latin aurea flamma, “golden flame”) was the battle standard of the King of France in the Middle Ages.

In French, the term has come to mean any banner with pointed ends; by association with the form of the original.

When the Oriflamme was displayed on the battlefield it indicated that no quarter was to be given, its red colour being symbolic of cruelty and ferocity.

The Battle of Posada (November 9, 1330 – November 12, 1330) was fought between Basarab I of Wallachia and Charles I Robert of Hungary.
The small Wallachian army led by Basarab, formed of cavalry, foot archers, as well as local peasants, managed to ambush and defeat the 30,000-strong Hungarian army, in a mountainous region near the border between Oltenia and Severin.

The Battle of Posada (November 9, 1330 – November 12, 1330) was fought between Basarab I of Wallachia and Charles I Robert of Hungary.

The small Wallachian army led by Basarab, formed of cavalry, foot archers, as well as local peasants, managed to ambush and defeat the 30,000-strong Hungarian army, in a mountainous region near the border between Oltenia and Severin.