gnostix1 said: Only if we can tintinabulate afterwards.

You guys know how to make me blush

About the Sutton Hoo exhibit…

My main area of study is literature, but literature and my love for mythology overlaps around the era of Sutton Hoo; bringing too my pet interest in the cultures and I never expected to actually see the Sutton Hoo finds in person during a short trip to London; I told myself highlights of museums only, I couldn’t spend too much time at any of them if I wanted to see all of them but at the British Museum, I ended up spending most of the day. I picked a direction when I got there and went up the stairs and turned a corner and THERE was the SUTTON HOO HELMET STARING AT ME. Not much higher than me, I could nearly look it in the eyes, it was beautiful. The line to see the “restored” replica was a lot longer than to see the remains of the original; but its a main exhibit; and the trove they recovered from the site is fantastic…As my introduction to London museums, it could have been much better.

Caerphilly Castle is one of the great medieval castles of western Europe. Several factors give it this title: its immense size (1.2h), making it the largest in Britain after Windsor, its large-scale use of water for defense and the fact that it is the first truly concentric castle in Britain. Of the time of its building in the late 13th century, it was a revolutionary masterpiece of military planning.
More
image (x)

Caerphilly Castle is one of the great medieval castles of western Europe. Several factors give it this title: its immense size (1.2h), making it the largest in Britain after Windsor, its large-scale use of water for defense and the fact that it is the first truly concentric castle in Britain. Of the time of its building in the late 13th century, it was a revolutionary masterpiece of military planning.

More

image (x)

Sutton Hoo 75th anniversary

On this day, in 1939, archaeologist Basil Brown investigated the largest of many Anglo-Saxon burial mounds on the property of Mrs Edith Pretty in Sutton Hoo. He made one of the most spectacular archaeological discoveries of all time – an undisturbed burial of an important early 7th-century East Anglian. 

The hoard is displayed in Room 41 of the British Museum, which has just reopened, fully renovated for the first time. Admission is free, so please go and submit a post about your visit. I’d be more than happy to post it.

Sutton Hoo 75th anniversary

On this day, in 1939, archaeologist Basil Brown investigated the largest of many Anglo-Saxon burial mounds on the property of Mrs Edith Pretty in Sutton Hoo. He made one of the most spectacular archaeological discoveries of all time – an undisturbed burial of an important early 7th-century East Anglian. 

The hoard is displayed in Room 41 of the British Museum, which has just reopened, fully renovated for the first time. Admission is free, so please go and submit a post about your visit. I’d be more than happy to post it.

ehonauta said: I’ve actually read a theory that she had horrific migraines - which can cause all kinds of weird visual phenomena.

philosoraptrix said: What’s your take on the migraine theory?

The only problem I have with this theory is the fact that she was soooo prolific. I don’t know how often she was supposed to have these, but migraines render you pretty much useless. (At least in my case, I have a three day migraine at least once a month - personal info for argument’s sake). But she lived to be 81, so she could’ve found a way to live with those, and still be able to work. But - I posted a recipe of hers for “Happy cookies" which have some interesting properties, hence the name. So I like to imagine she… you know. :)

China has sealed off parts of its northwestern city of Yumen after a resident died of bubonic plague last week, state media reported on Tuesday.
A 38-year-old victim was infected by a marmot, a wild rodent, and died on July 16. Several districts of the city of about 100,000 people in Gansu province were subsequently turned into special quarantine zones, Xinhua said.
Read on

China has sealed off parts of its northwestern city of Yumen after a resident died of bubonic plague last week, state media reported on Tuesday.

A 38-year-old victim was infected by a marmot, a wild rodent, and died on July 16. Several districts of the city of about 100,000 people in Gansu province were subsequently turned into special quarantine zones, Xinhua said.

Read on

Medieval Graffiti - not so rare after all

A project to record the graffiti, which began in Norfolk, has now been rolled out to other areas and is gradually spreading across England.

Armed with just a torch and a camera, a team of volunteers have recorded more than 28,000 images from churches in Norfolk alone and are a third of the way through searching Norwich Cathedral, where there are many more examples. Read on

  1. Ottonian crown on display at Essen’s cathedral treasury, ca. 1100. Long believed to be the infant crown of king of Romans Otto III
  2. Long called the Crown of St. Louis and thought to have been made in Paris, the Crown of Liège, acquired by the Louvre in 1947, is now known to be a Mosan piece (late 13th century)
  3. Crown of Elizabeth Kotromanic (born ca. 1339) in Zadar, given by Louis I of Hungary