sundrycreations said: Please do not use the word “cr*pple,” it’s actually a slur against the physically disabled.

I meant no offence. I didn’t know that actually. Now, I googled a bit, but as always with these things, got equally mixed results. Tumblr?

Marginalia for dummies: butts, killer bunnies and snails, dick-trees, fighting cripples, also butts

Disability during the Middle Ages
In medieval England, the 'lepre', the 'blynde', the 'dumbe', the 'deaff', the 'natural fool', the 'creple', the 'lame' and the 'lunatick' were a highly visible presence in everyday life. People could be born with a disability, or were disabled by diseases such as leprosy, or years of backbreaking work.
Attitudes to disability were mixed. People thought it was a punishment for sin, or the result of being born under the hostile influence of the planet Saturn. Others believed that disabled people were closer to God - they were suffering purgatory on earth rather than after death and would get to heaven sooner.
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Disability during the Middle Ages

In medieval England, the 'lepre', the 'blynde', the 'dumbe', the 'deaff', the 'natural fool', the 'creple', the 'lame' and the 'lunatick' were a highly visible presence in everyday life. People could be born with a disability, or were disabled by diseases such as leprosy, or years of backbreaking work.

Attitudes to disability were mixed. People thought it was a punishment for sin, or the result of being born under the hostile influence of the planet Saturn. Others believed that disabled people were closer to God - they were suffering purgatory on earth rather than after death and would get to heaven sooner.

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Ok. I’ll use tw:torture and torture tw tag from now on, so you can blacklist it if you are uncomfortable with some posts.

I’m sorry to see an unusual number of unfollows, but you can’t have a Medieval blog without some torture devices. 

Medieval Food Preservation
Fruits were often dried, but a far more tasty method of preserving them past their season was to seal them up in honey. Occasionally, they might be boiled in a sugar mixture, but sugar was an expensive import, so only the cooks of the wealthiest families were likely to use it. Honey had been used as a preservative for thousands of years, and it wasn’t limited to preserving fruit; meats were also stored in honey on occasion.
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Medieval Food Preservation

Fruits were often dried, but a far more tasty method of preserving them past their season was to seal them up in honey. Occasionally, they might be boiled in a sugar mixture, but sugar was an expensive import, so only the cooks of the wealthiest families were likely to use it. Honey had been used as a preservative for thousands of years, and it wasn’t limited to preserving fruit; meats were also stored in honey on occasion.

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Medieval Islamic Art

  1. Blue and White bowl, Iran, 13th century, fritware, painted in cobalt blue under a transparent glaze
  2. Capital, 10th century Spain, Madinat al-Zahra
  3. Qur’an Bifolio- Probably Tunisia, late 9th – early 10th century, vellum, ink, gold, silver, blue dye
  4. Casket, 13th century Mosul, decorated with polychrome lustre
  5. Chess pieces, quartz., 10th century, Fatimid period

It is not impossible to conserve historical architecture without damaging its integrity in any way. Modern and old can be tastefully and unpretentiously bound together. The perfect example is the Waterford Museum.

The Medieval Museum has won Best Public Building in the RIAI Awards in Dublin on Tuesday 24th June 2014, and there has been a Highly Commended Award for the public realm works in the Viking Triangle.

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