For the medieval man and woman, the eyes and their gazes were an important part of sexuality. In her book, Medieval Life, Roberta Gilchrist explains that according to medieval theories about sight, “the eye was not a passive receiver but was instead active in sending out rays of sight toward the object of vision. The very act of looking could stimulate desire in the observer and the observed.” Women were typically advised to avoid looking at men so as not to tempt them.

Medieval Hair Care
So that hair might grow wherever you wish. Take barley bread with the crust, and grind it with salt and bear fat. But first burn the barley bread. With this mixture anoint the place and the hair will grow.
Cook down dregs of white wine with honey to the consistency of a cerotum and anoint the hair, if you wish it to be golden. 
If the woman wishes to have long and black hair, take a green lizard and, having removed its head and tail , cook it in common oil. Anoint the head with this oil. It makes the hair long and black.
If, needed, you wish to have hair soft and smooth and fine, wash it often with hot water in which there is powder of natron [Native hydrous sodium carbonate] and vetch.
Take some dried roses, clove, nutmeg, watercress and galangal. Let all these, powdered, be mixed with rose water. With this water let her sprinkle her hair and comb it with a comb dipped in this same water so that [her hair] will smell better. And let her make furrows in her hair and sprinkle on the above-mentioned powder, and it will smell marvelously.
("De Ornatu Mulierum /On Women’s Cosmetics." in The Trotula : A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2001))
image: Lorenzo Costa, Portrait of a Woman

Medieval Hair Care

  • So that hair might grow wherever you wish. Take barley bread with the crust, and grind it with salt and bear fat. But first burn the barley bread. With this mixture anoint the place and the hair will grow.
  • Cook down dregs of white wine with honey to the consistency of a cerotum and anoint the hair, if you wish it to be golden
  • If the woman wishes to have long and black hair, take a green lizard and, having removed its head and tail , cook it in common oil. Anoint the head with this oil. It makes the hair long and black.
  • If, needed, you wish to have hair soft and smooth and fine, wash it often with hot water in which there is powder of natron [Native hydrous sodium carbonate] and vetch.
  • Take some dried roses, clove, nutmeg, watercress and galangal. Let all these, powdered, be mixed with rose water. With this water let her sprinkle her hair and comb it with a comb dipped in this same water so that [her hair] will smell better. And let her make furrows in her hair and sprinkle on the above-mentioned powder, and it will smell marvelously.

("De Ornatu Mulierum /On Women’s Cosmetics." in The Trotula : A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2001))

image: Lorenzo Costa, Portrait of a Woman

Anonymous asked:

Hey! I've just seen the "Call Me Maybe" cover video in old english and I was wondering if you know why old english is so different from modern english. Because I have studied spanish literature and, for example, the "Mío Cid" is written in old spanish (12th century) and it has its differences with modern spanish but it is understandable. Thank you! Love your blog!

In short - all languages evolved through centuries, but perhaps none as much as English. The language people spoke on The Islands was shaped by people who “visited” them. And by visited I mean invaded. First wave brought Jutes, Angles and Saxons who brought Germanic influences. Combine them, and you get Old English. Then the Vikings came, later Normans, this time bringing French influences, and word by word, the language was shaped into what we can read in, for example, Shakespeare. This is the first point when we could go back in time and, without many difficulties, understand the language.

And thanks for writing!

(And here is a more detailed look)

Hex

You know I don’t do reblogs but this… *shudders*
Let’s nip it in the bud: Not. Shakespeare. It’s from Verdi’s Falstaff libretto.
In detail

You know I don’t do reblogs but this… *shudders*

Let’s nip it in the bud: Not. Shakespeare. It’s from Verdi’s Falstaff libretto.

In detail

(via thisivyhouse)

The Lorsch Gospels is an illuminated Gospel Book written between 778 and 820, roughly coinciding with the period of Charlemagne's rule over the Frankish Empire. Both the manuscript and the carved ivory panels from the cover are rare and important survivals from the art of this period.

John Duns Scotus was born in the town of Duns near the English-Scottish boarder sometime in the 1260s. Educated both in England and at the University of Paris, he died in Cologne, Germany in 1308. Known for the complexity of his thought, he was referred to in the Middle Ages as the Subtle Doctor.
You can read about his philosophical views (and other Medieval notions of free will) here. 

John Duns Scotus was born in the town of Duns near the English-Scottish boarder sometime in the 1260s. Educated both in England and at the University of Paris, he died in Cologne, Germany in 1308. Known for the complexity of his thought, he was referred to in the Middle Ages as the Subtle Doctor.

You can read about his philosophical views (and other Medieval notions of free will) here

Lady dinosaur in Victorian London made me wonder about fossils during the Middle Ages. They were found and discussed, as early as Aristotle, and later Ibn Sina and Albert of Saxony. By the XVI century, extensive collections were gathered and classified.
This one, in particular, is a fossilized mammoth bone, gift by Emperor Frederick III to the St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna in 1443.

Lady dinosaur in Victorian London made me wonder about fossils during the Middle Ages. They were found and discussed, as early as Aristotle, and later Ibn Sina and Albert of Saxony. By the XVI century, extensive collections were gathered and classified.

This one, in particular, is a fossilized mammoth bone, gift by Emperor Frederick III to the St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna in 1443.

A famous physician and philosopher, Moses ben Maimon (known as Maimonides), was born in Cordova in 1135. He studied in Spain and Morocco before emigrating to Palestine in 1165. Later he practiced in Egypt and had  the unique distinction of being the physician to both the Moslem Regent of Egypt and Richard the Lion-Heart during the Crusades. One of his significant contributions to the secular literature is his “Medical Aphorisms”.

Periodontology 2000, Vol. 15, 1997, 7-14 

Image: (x) Maimonides’ statue in Cordoba

A famous physician and philosopher, Moses ben Maimon (known as Maimonides), was born in Cordova in 1135. He studied in Spain and Morocco before emigrating to Palestine in 1165. Later he practiced in Egypt and had  the unique distinction of being the physician to both the Moslem Regent of Egypt and Richard the Lion-Heart during the Crusades. One of his significant contributions to the secular literature is his “Medical Aphorisms”.

Periodontology 2000, Vol. 15, 1997, 7-14 

Image: (x) Maimonides’ statue in Cordoba

First arrival of the Romanies outside Bern in the 15th century, described by the chronicler as getoufte heiden (“baptized heathens”) and drawn with dark skin and wearing Saracen-style clothing and weapons.

First arrival of the Romanies outside Bern in the 15th century, described by the chronicler as getoufte heiden (“baptized heathens”) and drawn with dark skin and wearing Saracen-style clothing and weapons.

According to surviving records, a cucking stool was used since the 13th century to punish “disorderly women, scolds and dishonest tradesmen” by dunking them in water (usually a river). This form of public humiliation was often used at the time. 

One New Jersey law prescribing ducking for scolds remained on the books, if overlooked, until the year 1972 when it was finally thrown out by a state judge.

images: (top) A 17th century woodcut, (bottom) Ducking stool at Leominster, last used in 1809