Medieval Graffiti - not so rare after all

A project to record the graffiti, which began in Norfolk, has now been rolled out to other areas and is gradually spreading across England.

Armed with just a torch and a camera, a team of volunteers have recorded more than 28,000 images from churches in Norfolk alone and are a third of the way through searching Norwich Cathedral, where there are many more examples. Read on

  1. Ottonian crown on display at Essen’s cathedral treasury, ca. 1100. Long believed to be the infant crown of king of Romans Otto III
  2. Long called the Crown of St. Louis and thought to have been made in Paris, the Crown of Liège, acquired by the Louvre in 1947, is now known to be a Mosan piece (late 13th century)
  3. Crown of Elizabeth Kotromanic (born ca. 1339) in Zadar, given by Louis I of Hungary

This recipe taken from Forme of Curye, ab. 1390 A.D. (Pages 76v & 77r). The images are from the original manuscript as digitized by the John Rylands University Library and the 1780 printing edited by Samuel Pegge.

Tart in Ember Day

Take and parboil onions and herbs and press out the water and chop them small, take bread and pound it in a mortar and temper it with egg, do thereto butter, saffron and slat and raisins Corinth and a little sugar with fine powder and bake it in a shell and serve it forth.

Interpretation:

Bring pot of water to boil. Peel and quarter onions, place in boiling water for 2-3 minutes, then drain. Chop onions and parsley and combine with bread crumbs, eggs, butter, currants, sugar, salt, and spices. Pour into prepared pie crust and bake at 350°F for 30-40 minutes, ensuring that the egg is set. Let cool for 10-15 minutes before cutting into serving sizes.

For ingredients and more info visit the source.

Anonymous asked:

Hi! Okay, so this is going to sound weird, but I was wondering if you know if glue existed in the Middle Ages. I am writing a story set in that period and one of the characters broke a porcelain box so I need to know if it's possible to fix it or not. Sorry for the weird question, and thanks in advance!

Hi! Thanks for writing and it’s not weird at all. I love helping writers and illustrators.

The thing is, you might have more problems with the box itself, than the glue. Many types of glue existed. I found this great piece of writing about it. Medieval Glues Up to 1600 CE. Very useful table at the beginning.

Now - unless your character is in China, they are highly unlikely to have a porcelain box. This material started being imported in Europe only in the 16th century and even then it was very expensive. For the sake of the story, you could go with any earthenware. It was a lot more common.

I’d love to read the story once it’s finished. If you have any other questions, I’d be more than glad to help.

Hex 

On this day (July 4) a supernova SN 1054 was first observed in 1054 (figures). It was documented by contemporary Chinese astronomers, but there are also subsequent records in Japan. It could be seen for several months during daytime. 
image: Henry III (Holy Roman Emperor, not England’s) pointing to a new star

On this day (July 4) a supernova SN 1054 was first observed in 1054 (figures). It was documented by contemporary Chinese astronomers, but there are also subsequent records in Japan. It could be seen for several months during daytime. 

image: Henry III (Holy Roman Emperor, not England’s) pointing to a new star

egilskalla-grimsson said:Yeah… “dark ages”. My ass! And who knows about the ‘Renaissance of the 12th century’? Almost nobody! :-(

To make matters even more interesting, there were actually three, so called, Medieval Renaissances.

  1. Carolingian (8th c.) - creation of schools with unified curricula, music notation, basis of Romanesque art, revolutions in architecture, standardization of currency…  
  2. Ottonian (10th c.) - art, art, art
  3. 12th century - unify all the kingdoms, translate all the Greek, open all the trade routes, invent all the goodies…

Some headlines I see every day:

  • Declared medieval-style war…
  • Robber goes medieval…
  • Poor live in medieval conditions…

No wonder we get a bad name. Justice for Middle Ages!