Word of the day
 
Barding (also spelled bard or barb) is armour for horses. During the late Middle Ages as armour protection for knights became more effective, their mounts became targets. This tactic was effective for the Scots at the Battle of Bannockburn in the fourteenth century when horses were killed by the infantry and the English at the Battle of Crécy in the fourteenth century where archers shot horses and heavy infantry killed the French knights after they were dismounted. Barding developed as a response to such events.
Surviving period examples of barding are rare; however, complete sets are on display at the Wallace Collection in London, and the Royal Armouries in Leeds.

Word of the day

Barding (also spelled bard or barb) is armour for horses. During the late Middle Ages as armour protection for knights became more effective, their mounts became targets. This tactic was effective for the Scots at the Battle of Bannockburn in the fourteenth century when horses were killed by the infantry and the English at the Battle of Crécy in the fourteenth century where archers shot horses and heavy infantry killed the French knights after they were dismounted. Barding developed as a response to such events.

Surviving period examples of barding are rare; however, complete sets are on display at the Wallace Collection in London, and the Royal Armouries in Leeds.