Butter in a Medieval Household
To make butter the milk is first churned in a barrel with a plunger with holes in it, gradually after a lot of work the milk separates into butter and buttermilk. This mix is strained to remove the butter pieces, the buttermilk makes a refreshing drink or can be used for cooking.
Sweet butter is for immediate use and is rinsed in water before patting to remove all the excess water.
Salted butter for storage was patted without rinsing, to remove all the buttermilk, it was then heavily salted. This salt was washed out before it was used for eating.
Butter for cooking was first melted and strained before putting into pots a process known as clarifying.
Butter for health purposes was left in the sunlight for 12-14 days, this bleaches it and removes the Vitamin A, whilst adding Vitamin D. This was given to children to help prevent rickets.

Butter in a Medieval Household

To make butter the milk is first churned in a barrel with a plunger with holes in it, gradually after a lot of work the milk separates into butter and buttermilk. This mix is strained to remove the butter pieces, the buttermilk makes a refreshing drink or can be used for cooking.

  • Sweet butter is for immediate use and is rinsed in water before patting to remove all the excess water.
  • Salted butter for storage was patted without rinsing, to remove all the buttermilk, it was then heavily salted. This salt was washed out before it was used for eating.
  • Butter for cooking was first melted and strained before putting into pots a process known as clarifying.
  • Butter for health purposes was left in the sunlight for 12-14 days, this bleaches it and removes the Vitamin A, whilst adding Vitamin D. This was given to children to help prevent rickets.