Places in England recently given protected status
Lostwithiel Battlefields, Cornwall. 1644
The two Civil War battlefields sites near Lostwithiel are the first additions to the Register of Battlefields. The Lostwithiel Campaign was the culmination of a long-running conflict enacted in Devon and Cornwall between the Parliamentarian force led by the Earl of Essex and the Royalists led  by King Charles I. The battles which took place were among the worst defeats suffered by a Parliamentarian army during the War, and among the Royalists’ greatest successes.

Places in England recently given protected status

  • Lostwithiel Battlefields, Cornwall. 1644

The two Civil War battlefields sites near Lostwithiel are the first additions to the Register of Battlefields. The Lostwithiel Campaign was the culmination of a long-running conflict enacted in Devon and Cornwall between the Parliamentarian force led by the Earl of Essex and the Royalists led  by King Charles I. The battles which took place were among the worst defeats suffered by a Parliamentarian army during the War, and among the Royalists’ greatest successes.

This is how you incorporate teaching history into the modern setting!
You can uncovering a real medieval mystery, walking the streets of Swansea. All you have to do is look for these pavement markers and use the interactive map.
There is much more involved in the project. You can take a look at the official page.
(The title name of the beta project is City Witness, so we can only hope for more of these to come)

This is how you incorporate teaching history into the modern setting!

You can uncovering a real medieval mystery, walking the streets of Swansea. All you have to do is look for these pavement markers and use the interactive map.

There is much more involved in the project. You can take a look at the official page.

(The title name of the beta project is City Witness, so we can only hope for more of these to come)

One of the earliest written testimonies of the donut can be found in the 13th century German epic Parzival. On his journeys, he comes to a town so desolate and poor that its people never heard the sound of frying Krapfen!
The town still exists, under the name of Wassertrüdingen (pictured above), and it is renowned for its jelly donuts. 

One of the earliest written testimonies of the donut can be found in the 13th century German epic Parzival. On his journeys, he comes to a town so desolate and poor that its people never heard the sound of frying Krapfen!

The town still exists, under the name of Wassertrüdingen (pictured above), and it is renowned for its jelly donuts. 


…Iron Herman was on the ground prostrate and seemingly finished. As Guy prepared to deliver the coup de grâce, Herman saw and took a brutal path to victory. From his place on the ground, he reached up and grabbed Guy’s testicles, held on to them tight, and then shoved Guy aside without loosening his grip…
- A Flemish murder inquiry in the 12th century that was resolved in a duel

Unlike the Martell/Clegane showdown, real trials by combat were often governed by rules to ensure they weren’t David/Goliath affairs—competitors were to use similar weapons, be of similar skill levels, etc. More about medieval trial by combat

…Iron Herman was on the ground prostrate and seemingly finished. As Guy prepared to deliver the coup de grâce, Herman saw and took a brutal path to victory. From his place on the ground, he reached up and grabbed Guy’s testicles, held on to them tight, and then shoved Guy aside without loosening his grip…

- A Flemish murder inquiry in the 12th century that was resolved in a duel

Unlike the Martell/Clegane showdown, real trials by combat were often governed by rules to ensure they weren’t David/Goliath affairs—competitors were to use similar weapons, be of similar skill levels, etc. More about medieval trial by combat

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

Orban, also known as Urban (died 1453), was an iron founder and engineer from Brassó, Kingdom of Hungary who cast superguns for the Ottoman siege of Constantinople in 1453.

In 1452 he originally offered his services to the Byzantines, but emperor Constantine XI could not afford his high salary nor did he possess the materials necessary for constructing such a large siege cannon. Orban then left Constantinople and approached the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II who was in preparations to siege the city, claiming that his weapon could blast ‘the walls of Babylon itself’.

Given abundant funds and materials, the engineer built the gun within three months at Adrianople, from which it was dragged by sixty oxen to Constantinople.

Triumphal Quadriga

These four horses initially adorned the Hippodrome of Constantinople. During the Fourth Crusade they were taken to Venice by Doge Enrico Dandolo (1254). Petrarch mentions admiring them.

Then comes Napoleon (1797) who removes them and takes them to Paris, but not for long. In 1815 they were returned to Venice by Captain Dumaresq.

They were placed on St. Mark’s, but due to weather conditions originals were moved inside, and replicas were made for the outside.

How’s that for a turbulent history?

images(x)(x)

Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry (1416), March
The snow has melted and the peasants go about preparing the soil for the spring planting. In the background we can see the Château de Lusignan (in the Department of Vienne) on a hill top dominating the farmland about.
On the slopes below the castle we can see various peasant activities: a shepherd and his dog looking after a flock of sheep; three peasants pruning the vines; a vineyard which has already been prepared for the spring growing season; a peasant sifting a bag of seed corn; a peasant ploughing a field with two oxen.
Given its prominent place in the picture and the extraordinary detail with which it is painted, the Limburg brothers were keen to show how important agriculture was to the peasant economy and how dependent upon it for their upkeep were the castles of the aristocracy.

Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry (1416), March

The snow has melted and the peasants go about preparing the soil for the spring planting. In the background we can see the Château de Lusignan (in the Department of Vienne) on a hill top dominating the farmland about.

On the slopes below the castle we can see various peasant activities: a shepherd and his dog looking after a flock of sheep; three peasants pruning the vines; a vineyard which has already been prepared for the spring growing season; a peasant sifting a bag of seed corn; a peasant ploughing a field with two oxen.

Given its prominent place in the picture and the extraordinary detail with which it is painted, the Limburg brothers were keen to show how important agriculture was to the peasant economy and how dependent upon it for their upkeep were the castles of the aristocracy.

Three of the four oldest authentic harps to survive are of Gaelic provenance: the Trinity College Harp preserved in Trinity College Dublin, and the Queen Mary Harp and the Lamont Harp in the National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh.

The last two are examples of the small low-headed harp, and are both made from hornbeam, a wood not native to Scotland. All three are dated approximately to the 15th century and may have been made in Argyll in South-West Scotland.

Images x, x, x

E’s of England

  • Edward the Elder (c. 871–924)
  • Edward the Martyr (c. 962–978)
  • Edward the Confessor (c. 1004–1066)
  • Edward I of England (1239–1307)
  • Edward II of England (1284–1327)
  • Edward III of England (1312–1377)
  • Edward IV of England (1442–1483)
  • Edward V of England (1470–1483?)
  • Edward VI of England (1537–1553)
  • Edward VII of the United Kingdom (1841–1910)
  • Edward VIII of the United Kingdom (1894–1972)

H’s of England

Message from the Snowman Expert

Please, that is just the tip of the iceberg, a brief rough summary. For a true account please check out my book on the vast medieval history of snowman making. My book is available free in many places as well like libraries. Thanks, Bob Eckstein  http://www.amazon.com/The-History-Snowman-Bob-Eckstein/dp/1416940669

It’s so great to actually hear back from an author I posted about.

Thank you for writing Mr Eckstein. I hope my followers will read your book.