Showing posts tagged women

Saint Olga (of Kiev)
It is a strange historical twist that the first “Russian” woman to be canonized in the Orthodox Church was a Viking warrior princess who spent much of her life as a pagan.
Olga earned her sainthood by becoming the first member of the house of Riurik, the dynasty that ruled European Russia and parts of Ukraine and Belorus for more than seven centuries (860s – 1598), to convert to Christianity. But the role of this battle maid in the spread of Christendom to the eastern Slavs is only part of her remarkable contribution to the history of Eastern Europe.
You can read the rest of the story about her here.
image: Baptism of Princess Olga by Sergei Kirillov. HQ

Saint Olga (of Kiev)

It is a strange historical twist that the first “Russian” woman to be canonized in the Orthodox Church was a Viking warrior princess who spent much of her life as a pagan.

Olga earned her sainthood by becoming the first member of the house of Riurik, the dynasty that ruled European Russia and parts of Ukraine and Belorus for more than seven centuries (860s – 1598), to convert to Christianity. But the role of this battle maid in the spread of Christendom to the eastern Slavs is only part of her remarkable contribution to the history of Eastern Europe.

You can read the rest of the story about her here.

image: Baptism of Princess Olga by Sergei Kirillov. HQ

Burdened with children and landlords’ rent;
What they can put aside from what they make spinning they spend on housing,
Also on milk and meal to make porridge with
To sate their children who cry out for food
And they themselves also suffer much hunger,
And woe in wintertime, and waking up nights
To rise on the bedside to rock the cradle,
Also to card and comb wool, to patch and to wash,
To rub flax and reel yarn and to peel rushes
That it is pity to describe or show in rhyme
The woe of these women who live in huts

The late medieval poem Piers Plowman paints a pitiful picture of the life of the medieval peasant woman.

I hope this will help with your reenactments and fanart. :)

  1. Anglo-Saxon (600 – 1154): Simple Veils, Head-tires, Combs, and Pin
  2. Norman (1066-1154): Couvre-chef, hair uncovered, and extreme length
  3. Plantagenet (1154-1399): Wimple, Barbette, Fillet and Crespine
  4. Plantagenet (14th century): Horizontal Braiding, Gorget
  5. Plantagenet Crespine ( 1364-Late 14th century)
  6. Lancaster (1430-1460): Heart-shaped and Turban Headdresses
  7. York (1460-1485): Butterfly and Hennin
More info and styles at the source.

Beatriz de Dia (born c. 1140 - flourished circa 1175, Provence) was the most famous of a small group of trobairitz, or female troubadours who wrote courtly songs of love during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

A chantar m’er de so q”ieu no voldria

I must sing, whether I want to or not.

I feel so much pain from him whose

friend I am,

For I love him more than anything.

But neither grace nor courtesy has

any effect on him,

Nor my beauty, my decency, or my

intelligence.

I am despised and betrayed,

As though I were worthless.

Listening guide

A woman teaching geometry, from a 14th century illustration attributed to Abelard of Bath
In this 14th century illustration from a copy of Euclid’s Elements, a woman is shown holding a compass and square, teaching geometry to a group of monks.

A woman teaching geometry, from a 14th century illustration attributed to Abelard of Bath

In this 14th century illustration from a copy of Euclid’s Elements, a woman is shown holding a compass and square, teaching geometry to a group of monks.

The antifeminism common to fables and ecclesiastical texts develops the image of a woman sexually insatiable. 
image: Joan of Monbaston - illumination, taken from a Roman de la Rose - mid-fourteenth century
Ms. Fr 25526, fol. 106 v °, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris

The antifeminism common to fables and ecclesiastical texts develops the image of a woman sexually insatiable. 

image: Joan of Monbaston - illumination, taken from a Roman de la Rose - mid-fourteenth century

Ms. Fr 25526, fol. 106 v °, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris

I just read this, and hope it’s true.
Why is it that male and female button down shirts button opposite of each other?
"It dates back to when men usually carried swords. Since most people are right handed (and therefore hold their sword with their right hand), the sheath would be fastened to the left hip. When shirts were made for men, the buttons were attached to the right side so that when the sword was drawn, it wouldn’t catch on the overlap between the button and hole sides of the shirt.
Women would have a hand maid that would dress them. It is easier to put on shirts if the buttons are on the right side since most people are right handed and so for someone else to put on your shirt then it is easier if the buttons are on thier right side, your left. Having buttons on the left therefore was a sign of affluence and soon all womens’ shirts had buttons on the left. Men did not have someone to dress them therefore there buttons remained on the right while the womens’ migrated.”

I just read this, and hope it’s true.

Why is it that male and female button down shirts button opposite of each other?

"It dates back to when men usually carried swords. Since most people are right handed (and therefore hold their sword with their right hand), the sheath would be fastened to the left hip. When shirts were made for men, the buttons were attached to the right side so that when the sword was drawn, it wouldn’t catch on the overlap between the button and hole sides of the shirt.

Women would have a hand maid that would dress them. It is easier to put on shirts if the buttons are on the right side since most people are right handed and so for someone else to put on your shirt then it is easier if the buttons are on thier right side, your left. Having buttons on the left therefore was a sign of affluence and soon all womens’ shirts had buttons on the left. Men did not have someone to dress them therefore there buttons remained on the right while the womens’ migrated.”

Medieval Macedonia / Thrace, 14th-16th century AD. 
Exquisite gilded silver/bronze fertility bracelet. Given from a mother to her daughter upon her wedding, to be worn until she bears her first child. 
Made of bronze with layer of silver wash and gilded details. An ornate central cross with four crosses and star within, raised “breast” details on the edges of the body.

Medieval Macedonia / Thrace, 14th-16th century AD.

Exquisite gilded silver/bronze fertility bracelet. Given from a mother to her daughter upon her wedding, to be worn until she bears her first child.

Made of bronze with layer of silver wash and gilded details. An ornate central cross with four crosses and star within, raised “breast” details on the edges of the body.